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Coltrane Jazz (HQ-180 gram RTI pressing)

   Artist: John Coltrane
Label: Atlantic
Orig. Released: 1961
Catalog No.: LPATLA1354HQ
Condition: Sealed-Reissue
Format: LP (1.3)

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Description
"...a 1961 album by jazz musician John Coltrane. It was the first album released by Atlantic Records after his debut for that label, Giant Steps. Several of the songs on this album are outtakes from the session that produced "Naima" from the earlier LP. On those songs, Coltrane is backed by Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb from the Miles Davis sextet, of which Coltrane was still a member when the tracks were laid down (early 1960). "Village Blues", recorded several months later, marks the LP debut of Elvin Jones and McCoy Tyner with Coltrane. Coltrane plays tenor saxophone throughout. There are a few recordings where Coltrane plays the alto saxophone, though that is something he rarely did after 1946. He may also have played the smaller instrument on his final Atlantic album, Olé Coltrane."

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Wikipedia

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Track Titles
1. LITTLE OLD LADY
(By Hoagy Carmichael & Stanley Adams; Chappell, ASCAP. Time: 4:25)
2. VILLAGE BLUES
(By John Coltrane; Jowcol, BMI. Time: 5:21)
3. MY SHINING HOUR
(By Johnny Mercer & Harold Arlen; A. H. Morris, ASCAP. Time: 4:50)
4. FIFTH HOUSE
(By John Coltrane; Jowcol, BMI. Time: 4:38)

1. HARMONIQUE
(By John Coltrane; Jowcol, BMI. Time: 4:10)
2. LIKE SONNY
(By John Coltrane; Jowcol, BMI. Time: 5:51)
3. I'LL WAIT AND PRAY
(By Jerry Valentine & George Treadwell;
Sophisticate, BMI. Time: 3:32)
4. SOME OTHER BLUES
(By John Coltrane; Jowcol, BMI. Time: 5:33)


 

Liner Notes
I ONCE MENTIONED IN AN ARTICLE I WROTE FOR JAZZ REVIEW SOMETHING TO THE EFFECT THAT JOHN COLTRANE IS ALWAYS INTO THINGS;ALWAYS COMING UP WITH SOMETHING UNEXPECTED AND STARTLING. SHORTLY AFTER THAT, I FOUND OUT JUST HOW TRUE THIS STATEMENT REALLY IS. I RECALL AN OCCASION WHEN I DROPPED BY TO VISIT WITH 'TRANE, LATE IN 1959. I FOUND HIM PRACTICING, WITH THE TAPE RECORDER GOING. THE SOUNDS COMING OUT OF THAT TENOR OF HIS WERE BEYOND BELIEF; HE SEEMED TO BE PLAYING TWO NOTES AT ONCE, WHAT STRING PLAYERS CALL DOUBLE-STOPS. NOT THAT LITTLE TRICK SOME REEDMEN USE OF HUMMING OR SINGING A NOTE AND PLAYING ANOTHER ONE ABOVE OR BELOW IT, BUT REAL HONEST-TO-GOODNESS NOTES AND ON OCCASION HE COULD GET THREE AT A TIME. THAT WAS WHEN I FOUND OUT ABOUT THE HARMONICS ON A TENOR SAXOPHONE. 'TRANE TOLD ME HE'D LEARNED HOW TO DO THEM FROM SOME TENOR MAN IN PHILLY, HAD BEEN WORKING ON THEM FOR SOME TIME, AND "ONLY NOW I'M STARTING TO GET THEM." HE EXPLAINED HOW THEY WERE DONE;SOMETHING ABOUT A CERTAIN WAY OF TIGHTENING UP THE EMBOUCHURE AND CERTAIN FINGERINGS;BUT I COULDN'T QUITE GRASP IT, SINCE I'M NOT A TENOR SAXOPHONIST AND DON'T KNOW VERY MUCH ABOUT THE MECHANICS OF THE INSTRUMENT. HOWEVER, THAT DIDN'T STOP ME FROM LISTENING, MAKING A COMMENT HERE AND THERE, AND LEARNING SOMETHING. THE POINT I'M TRYING TO MAKE IS THAT THIS CONSTANT EXPERIMENTATION, THIS NEVER-ENDING PROBING INTO NEW THINGS AND NEW WAYS TO DO OLDER THINGS, IS CHARACTERISTIC OF 'TRANE. THIS APPLIES NOT ONLY TO HIS PLAYING, BUT ALSO TO HIS WRITING;TO HIS WHOLE WAY OF THINKING. HE RUNS UP ON SOMETHING NEW, WORKS AROUND WITH IT TILL HE GETS WHAT HE WANTS, AND INCORPORATES IT INTO HIS OVERALL CONCEPTION. HIS PREVIOUS ATLANTIC ALBUM, GIANT STEPS, OFFERS AMPLE PROOF OF THIS; TAKE, FOR EXAMPLE, THE CHARACTERISTIC UP-A-MINOR-THIRD-DOWN-A-FIFTH PROGRESSION OF THE TITLE TUNE, THE USE OF PEDAL-TONES ON SPIRAL AND NAIMA. ALL THESE ARE THE PRODUCTS OF ENDLESS EXPERIMENTATION AND WORKING-OUT, AND 'TRANE ISN'T FINISHED YET. COLTRANE JAZZ (AND I COULDN'T THINK OF A MORE APT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT HE DOES!) WAS RECORDED IMMEDIATELY AFTER GIANT STEPS, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF ONE TRACK (VILLAGE BLUES, RECORDED LATER), AND IN MANY WAYS REPRESENTS A CONTINUATION OF THE IDEAS AND CONCEPTS PRESENTED IN THE PRECEDING RECORD. THE FIVE COLTRANE ORIGINALS ON THIS ALBUM COULD ALMOST, NOTE THE ALMOST, BE CALLED "MORE OF THE SAME," INASMUCH AS TWO OF THE TUNES MAKE GOOD USE OF THE PEDAL-TONE AND/OR THE OSTINATO BASS (ACTUALLY THREE, BECAUSE HARMONIQUE HAS A B-FLAT RUNNING THROUGH THE BASS LINE ALMOST CONSTANTLY) AND ONE HAS THE CHARACTERISTIC GIANT STEPS CHANGES IN THE BRIDGE. BUT SOMEHOW, THE TREATMENT IS DIFFERENT. THERE'S SOMETHING ELSE IN THERE. EVEN THE THREE STANDARDS (AND NOTICE THAT 'TRANE MANAGES TO PICK THE SELDOM-DONE ONES TO RECORD) SOUND DIFFERENT. BEFORE I GO INTO DETAIL ABOUT THE TUNES, A WORD CONCERNING THE PERSONNEL: SEVEN OF THE TRACKS WERE RECORDED, APPARENTLY, AT THE SAME SESSION AS NAIMA , THE RHYTHM SECTION ON THOSE TRACKS CONSISTS OF WYNTON KELLY ON PIANO, PAUL CHAMBERS ON BASS AND JIMMY COBB ON DRUMS. VILLAGE BLUES WAS RECORDED SOMETIME AFTER 'TRANE HAD ORGANIZED HIS OWN GROUP: MCCOY TYNER IS ON PIANO, STEVE DAVIS ON BASS AND ELVIN JONES ON DRUMS. LITTLE OLD LADY IS ONE OF THOSE INFREQUENTLY-HEARD OR "NOT-SO-STANDARD" STANDARDS. APPARENTLY THE "LITTLE OLD LADY" 'TRANE HAD IN MIND IS QUITE A SPRY LITTLE SWINGER, FOR HE TAKES THIS ONE AT A MEDIUM-UP-TEMPO THAT GROOVES FROM BEGINNING TO END. NOTHING COMPLICATED HERE, HE PLAYS THE TUNE, INCLUDING THE VERSE, THEN KELLY AND CHAMBERS (THE LATTER PLAYING PIZZICATO) HAVE A SOLO CHORUS APIECE, THEN 'TRANE RETURNS TO TAKE IT OUT, BUT INSTEAD OF STOPPING SHORT AT THE END HE FADES OUT OVER A LATIN BEAT: VILLAGE BLUES IS THE FIRST OF THE COLTRANE ORIGINALS TO APPEAR ON THIS RECORD; A "DOWN" SORT OF BLUES, STRANGELY EVOCATIVE. OVER AN OSTINATO FIGURE IN THE BASS, TYNER STATES THE DECEPTIVELY SIMPLE THEME AT FIRST, THEN COLTRANE PICKS IT UP. MY SHINING HOUR IS DONE HERE AS A BRIGHT-TEMPOED SWINGER, WITH TRANE BLOWING IN HIS USUAL WARM, STRAIGHTFORWARD FASHION. I HAVE NOTICED FOR A LONG TIME THAT EVEN AT A FAST TEMPO HIS PLAYING HAS IN IT A REMARKABLE LYRICISM AT ONCE THOUGHTFUL AND INTENSE, THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST SALIENT FEATURES OF HIS STYLE. FIFTH HOUSE IS ONE OF 'TRANE'S MOST POWERFUL LINES, AND A TUNE WHICH OFFERS ANOTHER PUZZLE TO THE LISTENER. IT IS BASED ON THE COUNTDOWN CHANGES SUPERIMPOSED PART OF THE WAY ON A PEDAL C AND G; YET ONE GETS AN IDEA THAT THIS TUNE MAY BE BASED ON A STANDARD; THE WAY THE PHRASES MOVE HINTS AT THIS. HARMONIQUE GETS ITS TITLE FROM THE HARMONICS TRANE PLAYS ON THE THEME. A DELIBERATE AND DOWN-TO-EARTH BLUES IN 3/4 TIME, IT HAS AN ALMOST MONKISH HUMOR IN ITS WIDE SKIPS, WHICH FIND TRANE JUMPING FROM A LOW NOTE TO A HIGH HARMONIC AND IN THE ACCENTUATION OF THE FIRST BEAR BY THE BASS. IT IS ALSO A BIT REMINISCENT OF ANOTHER 3/4 BLUES I'VE HEARD HIM PLAY: MCCOY TYNER'S THE BELIEVER. TRANE FOOLS SOME MORE WITH THE HARMONICS AT THE START OF HIS SOLO, THEN GOES RIGHT INTO HIS 'TYPICAL COLTRANE BLUES STUFF. LIKE SONNY IS SO CALLED, SAYS COLTRANE, BECAUSE HE ONCE HEARD SONNY ROLLINS PLAY THE LITTLE FIGURE ON WHICH THE TUNE IS BUILT, AND HE LIKED IT SO MUCH HE DECIDED TO USE IT IN ONE OF HIS OWN LINES. I'VE ALWAYS CALLED IT HIS IMPRESSION OF SONNY. EITHER WAY, IT'S A VERY ATTRACTIVE LITTLE THEME, LATIN-FLAVORED AT THE BEGINNING, THEN GOING INTO STRAIGHT SWINGING. I'LL WAIT AND PRAY (AGAIN, A SELDOM-DONE STANDARD ) IS THE ONLY BALLAD OF THE SET, AND IT GIVES 'TRANE A CHANCE TO DEMONSTRATE HIS WONDERFUL WAY WITH A BALLAD. SOLOING ALL THE WAY, HE BLOWS WITH WARMTH AND INTENSITY, MAKING EFFECTIVE USE OF HIS EXPRESSIVE HIGH REGISTER, WHILE THE RHYTHM SECTION BACKS HIM UP SENSITIVELY. (NOTE THE HARMONIC HE PLAYS AT THE END OF THIS ONE.) SOME OTHER BLUES IS JUST THAT. A FRIEND OF MINE, ANOTHER TENOR MAN, HEARD THIS ONE AND REMARKED THAT IT "STARTED OUT LIKE NOW'S THE TIME AND TURNED INTO SOME OTHER BLUES." EVERYONE WAILS HERE, AND THERE'S A BRILLIANT EXCHANGE OF FOURS BEFORE THEY TAKE IT OUR. AND THERE YOU HAVE IT: COLTRANE JAZZ. FROM THIS POINT ON I WILL NOT SAY ANY MORE, I'LL JUST LET MR. COLTRANE TAKE OVER AND DO THE TALKING HIMSELF. ZITA CARNO ZITA CARNO IS AN OUTSTANDING YOUNG PIANIST AND COMPOSER WHO HAS DISTINGUISHED HERSELF IN BOTH CLASSICAL MUSIC AND JAZZ. A NATIVE OF NEW YORK, MISS CARNO ATTENDED PUBLIC SCHOOLS THERE AND RECEIVED HER ADVANCED MUSICAL EDUCATION AT THE MANHATTAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC (BACHELOR'S AND MASTER'S DEGREES). JAZZ TRUMPETER DONALD BYRD, WHO ATTENDED THE MANHATTAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC AT THE TIME THAT MISS CARNO DID, "FIRST DEVELOPED IN ME SOMETHING MORE THAN A CASUAL INTEREST IN JAZZ. MY SERIOUS LISTENING TO JAZZ STARTED AT THAT TIME," MISS CARNO SAYS. MISS CARNO MADE HER NEW YORK DEBUT AT A RECITAL IN TOWN HALL IN DECEMBER 1959. ENTHUSIASTIC CRITICAL NOTICES LED TO HER BEING ENGAGED FOR FOUR APPEARANCES AS PIANO SOLOIST WITH THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC, UNDER LEONARD BERNSTEIN, IN OCTOBER 1960. SHE PLAYED MOZART'S PIANO CONCERTO IN D MINOR, K. 466 AND WALLINGFORD RIEGGER'S VARIATIONS FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA. THE NEW -YORK TIMES REVIEWER COMMENTED ON THAT OCCASION, "SHE IS ONE OF THE REALLY IMPORTANT YOUNG PIANISTS. WITH HER MUSICAL INSTINCTS, HER IDENTIFICATION WITH THE KEYBOARD AND HER SPLIT-SECOND RHYTHMIC IMPULSE, SHE WILL GO A LONG WAY."
Musicians
PERSONNEL ON VILLAGE BLUES, THE PERSONNEL IS: JOHN COLTRANE, TENOR SAX; MCCOY TYNER, PIANO; STEVE DAVIS, BASS; ELVIN JONES, DRUMS. ON ALL THE OTHER NUMBERS, THE PERSONNEL IS: JOHN COLTRANE, TENOR SAX; WYNTON KELLY, PIANO; PAUL CHAMBERS, BASS; JIMMY COBB, DRUMS. RECORDING ENGINEERS: TOM DOWD & PHIL IEHLE COVER PHOTO: LEE FRIEDLANDER COVER DESIGN: LORING EUTEMEY SUPERVISION: NESUHI ERTEGUN
 
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